Supply Chain Module Aims to Improve Health Commodity Management

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Date
June 11, 2019
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Good health outcomes depend on a strong supply chain. 

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Munezero Aimable, Ruhengeri Referral Hospital pharmacist demonstrating how to calculate average monthly consumption of commodities.
Munezero Aimable, Ruhengeri Referral Hospital pharmacist demonstrating how to calculate average monthly consumption of commodities.
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Munezero Aimable, Ruhengeri Referral Hospital Pharmacist, demonstrates how to calculate average monthly consumption of commodities.
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In Rwanda, the USAID Global Health Supply Chain Program-Procurement and Supply Management (GHSC-PSM) project partnered with the Ministry of Health to roll out a supply chain training module (SCM) to health facilities. 

The training was held in all 30 districts of Rwanda and equipped health facility staff with skills in inventory management, commodity transportation, the resupply of health commodities, and the use of Rwanda’s electronic logistics management information system (eLMIS). 

The availability of medicines at health facilities is essential to ensuring treatment and prevention are accessible for communities in Rwanda. Health facilities are the key link in ensuring that medicines and other commodities are available to health workers and patients. That availability often depends on how well service delivery points manage their part of the supply chain. 

 “This training has equipped us with skills needed in our daily activities regarding inventory control in our respective service delivery points,” said Munezero Aimable, Ruhengeri Hospital District Pharmacist.

Equipped with good practices and new techniques from this training, attendees are expected to help reduce supply chain risks that affect the availability of critical medicines and health supplies like commodity stockouts, overstock, and the expiry of medicines. 

Site visits to be conducted by the Ministry of Health in June will evaluate whether lessons learned from the training are being put into practice at health facilities.